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914 Identify modifications

Page history last edited by Jay 10 years, 7 months ago

Back to 9.1 Structure of Plants

 

The question asks for identification of modifications of roots, stems, and leaves in a plant; therefore, your answer needs to consist of those parts as the main categories. Then, the question states specifically which modifications you need to identify, such as bulbs, stem tubers, storage roots, and tendrils; hence, it is essential for these to be a part of your answer.

 

Roots

Storage roots-  Specialized cells within the root store large quantities of carbohydrates and water

                         e.g. Carrots and Beets

  

<http://vindicatethevegetable.wordpress.com/page/2/> and <http://www.cooksgarden.com/resources/cooksgarden/images/products/processed/500.zoom.a.jpg>

 

Stems 

Bulbs- Vertical, underground stems consisting of enlarged bases of leaves that store food; they are collections of thick leaf bases that store food. Because their stems are short, they don't look like leaves. They consist of swollen leaf bases attached to a short stem.

          e.g. Onions

 

<http://image.tutorvista.com/content/reproduction/dormant-bulb-stem-section.jpeg>

 

Stem tubers- Horizontally growing stems below ground that are modified as carbohydrate- storage structure; stem tubers, like potatoes, are swollen offshoots from the stem that allows the plant to grow every year. A new set of stems and roots grow from the tuber.

                    - e.g. Potatoes

<http://courses.cropsci.ncsu.edu/cs414/cs414_web/CH_1_2005_files/image006.jpg>

 

Leaves

Tendrils- Structures that coil around objects to aid in a support and climbing (may also be formed from modified stems); tendrils grow outward from leaves and spiral around until they make contact with a solid surface. They then attach themselves and the plant uses the solid surface to climb upwards.

              e.g. Pea plants produce tendrils from leaves

  

<http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_ideas/PlantBio_img029.jpg>

 

 

Assessment Questions:

- State one example of storage roots. (1)

- Outline two differences between the functions of a classic stem and stem tuber. (2)

 

Comments (1)

Jay said

at 9:03 pm on Apr 13, 2010

Eunji - FANTASTIC! This looks great! That is exactly why I have you a challenging one; WELL DONE!

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